BABY!!! Hermione’s birth story (1 of 3)

I’ve been gone for a while, so before I jump back into blogging about health, I wanted to give a bit (well really a horribly lengthy) explanation.

We had a little girl on July 19, 2011! Life since then hasn’t been what we expected, so here’s the first of 3 posts that will tell you about our journey so far, and it’s been a crazy one.

Prior to birth, we had no idea that anything was wrong other than that she was small.  At 25 weeks we were admitted to Mission Hospital in Asheville, she was too small and we almost had an early induction. However they adjusted the due date instead and sent us home after two days.  We had a total of 7 ultrasounds during the pregnancy to monitor her growth and none showed any defects.

I ate well and exercised regularly, did my Kegels, kept hydrated, took my vitamins, got plenty of sleep.  All those things we do when pregnant to be the best for ourselves and our babies.

After what seemed like an endless last two weeks, Hermione finally decided it was time to come out to play.  We went into labor on our own at 41 weeks and were able to have a drug free, natural childbirth at Mission Hospital with her oldest brother, grandmother, great grandmother and father all there to witness it. Her gender was a surprise and we were all very excited to have a little girl!

Hermione Beatrice Rose Robinson was born on July 19, 2011 at 2:47am.  She was 5lbs 14oz and 22 inches long.

Hermione just after she was born.

Within minutes of birth, the odyssey began. She was taken to the NICU because she was working too hard to breathe. It was there that a wonderful nurse discovered her cleft palate. Hermione has a cleft in her hard palate, so it’s not visible from the outside. After 4 hours of observation we were discharged from the NICU and sent to Mother/Baby.

There are lots of kinds of clefts, luckily Hermione's is fairly far back.

We never held her on Mother/Baby.  The nurses did their assessment and decided that she needed closer attention, saying she had too many secretions, so took her to the nursery. We were all well more than 24 hours without sleep so no one argued much. After a couple of hours it was decided to that she needed to go back to the NICU.

in the NICU

Her breathing was the issue and she was diagnosed with a Pierre Robin Sequence which includes a small lower jaw, a tongue which tens to ball up at the back of the mouth and fall back towards the throat, breathing problems and often a horsehoe-shaped cleft palate.

Hermione with her trumpette an IV.

Hermione was given a nasal trumpette (a tube through her nose) to help her breathe.  We were only able to hold her for very limited periods – her father didn’t get to hold her until she was three days old. She was fed through a tube in her nose and an IV directly into her veins.

It was decided to wait her out for a couple of weeks as some Pierre Robin babies outgrow the breathing issues. She had several dramatic drops in oxygen saturation, having to be bagged twice. Her color would change, she’d turn pale or dusky, even blue and purple when her oxygen went down. It was a constant battle to keep her oxygen levels at a high enough level to avoid brain damage.  She would often have a desat just from being touched.

A rare moment holding her in those first two weeks.

So there’s the story of the first two weeks of Hermione! Stay tuned for the rest of the story of our three and a half month hospital journey with Hermione.

Thanks for reading!

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Categories: Stories from My Life | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “BABY!!! Hermione’s birth story (1 of 3)

  1. Sounds so much like our story! Welcome sister! It’s going to be a journey! But your heart will be changed forever! I ❤ her name!

  2. Pingback: Lemonade « movingmama

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